TNF

Sally Centrifuge for developing countries

In Read on September 9, 2010 at 7:19 am

Two Rice University undergrads have invented a device that uses a salad spinner as a simple centrifuge that medical clinics in developing countries can use without electricity.

Lauren Theis and Lila Kerr with the Sally Centrifuge.  Photo by Jeff Fitlow/Rice University.

Lauren Theis and Lila Kerr with the Sally Centrifuge. Photo by Jeff Fitlow/Rice University.

Rice sophomore Lila Kerr and freshman Lauren Theis will take their Sally Centrifuge abroad for nearly two months this summer as part of Beyond Traditional Borders (BTB), Rice’s global health initiative that brings new ideas and technologies to underdeveloped countries. Kerr will take a spinner to Ecuador in late May, Theis will take one to Swaziland in early June and a third BTB team will take one to Malawi, also in June.

When tiny capillary tubes that contain about 15 microliters of blood are spun in the device for 10 minutes, the blood separates into heavier red blood cells and lighter plasma. The hematocrit, or ratio of red blood cells to the total volume, measured with a gauge held up to the tube, can tell clinicians if a patient is anemic. That detail is critical for diagnosing malnutrition, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS and malaria.

Click through for the full story and a video interview with the creators (who both have non-engineering backgrounds, BTW).

Via:  Freakonomics

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  1. Simply, brilliant!

  2. this is amazing Ry…once again, I love the international aspects of TNF! I posted it on my FB, so hopefully you’ll get some traffic today 🙂

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